Maps and mountains, lions and tigers, rivers and oceans-all sorts of things you didn't know about India's geography.

Could you be related to a blond Lithuanian? What if ostriches once roamed in India? Did you know that India is the only country that has both lions and tigers? Who found out how tall Mt Everest is?

If you've ever wanted to know the answers to questions like these, this is the book for you. In here you will discover various things you never expected, such as the fact that we still greet each other like the Harappans did or that people used to think India was full of one-eyed giants. And sneakily you'll also know more about India's history and geography by the end of it. Full of quirky pictures and crazy trivia, this book takes you on a fantastic journey through the incredible history of India's geography.
 

An adaptation of The Ocean of Churn for young readers

When did the first humans arrive in India and how did they get here?
What are Roman artefacts from hundreds of years ago doing in a town near Puducherry?
How did merchants from Arabia end up near Kochi?
From the east coast of Africa to Australia, one big blue body of water has connected diverse peoples and cultures for thousands of years: the incredible Indian Ocean. Read on to learn about the fearless travellers and sailors, pirates and conquerors who set out to cross the ocean in search of gold and glory, and discover how geography can shape the course of history.

About the Author

Sanjeev Sanyal is the principal economic advisor to the Government of India and an internationally acclaimed economist and urban theorist. He writes on a range of topics ranging from economics to history, and is the author of the bestselling books The Ocean of Churn, Land of the Seven Rivers and The Indian Renaissance. In 2014, he was given the inaugural International Indian Achievers Award for contributions to literature. He has been a fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, London; visiting scholar at Oxford University; adjunct fellow at Institute of Policy Studies, Singapore; and a senior fellow of the World Wide Fund for Nature.
Sanjeev spent two decades working in international financial markets and was named Young Global Leader 2010 by the World Economic Forum. In 2007, he was awarded the Eisenhower Fellowship for his work on urban issues. Sanjeev attended Shri Ram College of Commerce, Delhi, and St. John's College, Oxford, where he was Rhodes Scholar. He lives in Delhi.